After 60, Never Do These Things, Say Physicians — Eat This Not That

Our 60s can be filled with many great and healthy years, but it takes discipline and effort to live a quality life. We can help determine the length of our lifespan by cutting out bad habits and practicing positive choices and Eat This, Not That! Health spoke with experts who reveal their tips for living a long healthy life. Read on—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had COVID.

Mature white-haired woman checking eye wrinkles in front of mirror.
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Dr. Jacob Hascalovici MD, PhD, Clearing Chief Medical Officer tells us, “Bodies and minds are often so tough and resilient. There is only so much they can take though, so it becomes increasingly important to take care of them as we age. Though “being healthy” is often portrayed as a set of ‘Don’ts,” practicing good health is often a matter of swapping more supportive, vibrant habits for ones that may be dragging you down. If any of the habits below are true for you and you’re heading into your 60s and beyond, think about how you could taper off that habit and put another, healthier one in its place.”

Hand stubbed out cigarette in a transparent ashtray on wooden table
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Dr. Hascalovici says, “Smoking may be your chosen way to relax or just a deeply ingrained habit…it’s also deadly. It increases the risks of many chronic conditions and can make it harder for you to heal from any injuries, which only gets harder to deal with as you get older. As soon as you stop or slow down smoking, the body starts recuperating. What could you do to relax instead?”

Tired senior hispanic man sleeping on dark blue couch, taking afternoon nap at the living room
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Dr. Hascalovici explains, “Sitting kills! It can lead to more problems with your heart health, to lost muscle mass, to weaker bones, to weight gain, and to mood disorders. Though it feels as though it should be relaxing, sitting around or being sedentary actually hurts us a lot. It deprives us of natural mood-lifting hormones and weakens our bodies. The answer is to move more. How might that look for you?”

Coffee and Sugar Main Picture
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Dr. Hascalovici explains, “Among all the poor food decisions it’s possible to make, sugar is pretty high on the list. It’s compelling, attractive, and, sadly, nutritionally empty. With time, sugar can lead to poor moods, to diabetes, and to poor health overall. A little bit goes a long way (and should be enjoyed…but only in moderation!) Sugary sodas, many alcoholic beverages, and even some juices should be avoided. What could you drink instead?”

wide second squat
Jacquie Smith

Barbara Bergin, M.D. Retired Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon says, “Deep Squats are something someone over 60 should avoid. As we age, the meniscus and surface cartilages in our knees begin to wear out and weaken. They cannot withstand the kinds of pressures they could tolerate when we were young. Squatting puts tremendous pressure on the knee, and often can be responsible for tearing the meniscus and shearing articular cartilage right off the surface of our knees. This can lead to the beginning of arthritis. The exercise industry is currently invested in people doing all sorts of squats, to the benefit of…orthopedic surgeons. After 60, try something else: walking, straight leg raises, swimming, cycling.” 

Heather Newgen

Heather Newgen has two decades of experience reporting and writing about health, fitness, entertainment and travel. Heather currently freelances for several publications. Read more

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